Category Archives: Seven

Small World, Big Connections

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Happy Vishu!  Dear reader, may the coming year be blessed and prosperous for you and your family.

April 2017

Life in the Blue Mountains, Nilgiris, of South India was much simpler during my childhood. Back then it was a small world where service was close and personal. Our milk was delivered by a young woman named Helen who’s family also grew the most beautiful and fragrant roses. (Years later we bought huge bouquets of the colorful blooms for our wedding).  The baker was a family man who made sure he gave us the freshest coconut buns. Every winter the tangerine man came to our front door with a basket filled with tiny orange fruit, juicy and tart.

Even though our town was a sprawling tourist attraction, it was like living in a small village.  After my father’s death the entire town kept a close eye on my sister and me.  The stationary store owner, Rajan, knew when we had important exams and was ready to sell us the latest in fountain pens. The Alankar Bakery owner gave us an extra cookie or raisin-studded bun and always inquired about my mother and uncle (it didn’t matter to that he had never met my uncle!).

There was an invisible grapevine that was almost as effective as Twitter!   My mother heard all the important news of the day from her bus driver on her way home from work as a school teacher.  So of course she knew right away the one day I had left our school campus during lunch hour to visit the local bazaar. Surprisingly I didn’t get in trouble but it gave me pause because I knew there were a lot of eyes on me.  Small world, big connections!

I missed those personal interactions when I moved to California more than 30 years ago but I found another village in the city of Davis. For the past 19 years I have discovered that this college town has a small-town heart.  Small world, big connections.

Case in point: Recently I participated in a community theater production and was pleasantly surprised to see the cashier from the local supermarket in the audience. After the performance she hugged me and told me she’d see me at the store soon.  Another example of small world, big connections.

Social media can fool us into thinking that we are making personal connections while seated in front of our laptop computer or smart phone, but I have found that nothing beats face-to-face interactions.

So this coming year (April 14th we celebrated Vishu or Kerala New Year) I hope you will find the joy of life in the real world, away from the small screen.

THE END

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Filed under Blue Mountains, Celebrations, community theater, cooking, Fresh fruit, Fresh produce, Indian food, meatless, mindfulness, my mother's kitche, Nilgiris, Personal experience, recipes, Seven, South India, spring, renewal, Uncategorized, vegetables, world peace

New Ventures

September 2016

“My life it seems like a river with many bends. And it keeps bending all the time, this river.”

These words are uttered by Mu Sochua, a famed Cambodian activist, in a play titled Seven.

And it describes my life perfectly. I’m feeling a bit introspective these days because of some important milestones in my life. Recently my oldest son graduated from college and is financially independent and in a stable, loving relationship–every parent’s wish for their child. A birthday has come and gone meaning I’m a year older and deeper into middle age. Our 30th wedding anniversary is a few days away and brings back memories of those heady days of being a newly-wed. Where has time gone? It can be seen in the lines of my face, the white hairs glinting between my black ones and in my softening body. But it is not only my body that has changed over the years. My career has seen many bends too.

I started out wanting to be a novelist and then decided becoming a journalist was more practical. For years I worked in a busy newsroom and I loved the late-night meetings and looming deadlines. Then we decided to start a family and I wanted to be part of every moment of my baby’s life. I didn’t want to miss the first smile, the first step or his first birthday. And I didn’t. For the next few years I devoted myself to my two sons and it was rewarding, frustrating, challenging and wonderful.

Volunteering at my sons’ elementary school started a second career in a school library. So for the next few years I was part of a dynamic school community and I loved it!

Then that darn river took another turn. I had been dabbling in fiction writing and finally my novel was published! Suddenly I was busy with readings, author presentations and cooking demonstrations. For the past year I spent all my time writing everything from poetry to short stories. It has been successful and satisfying with several poems being published. A short story will appear in an anthology next year.  A second novel is well on its way.

But life keeps pushing me and I find myself on a community theater stage. From writer to actor. How did this happen?

This play is no typical drama or comedy. It is thought-provoking, emotional and uplifting.

I’m inviting all my blog readers to come see the play, not just to support me, but because it is such a powerful story about seven incredibly courageous women.

The play can be seen September 30 through October 9 at the Winters Community Center, 201 Railroad Avenue. More details about show times, ticket prices and other information can be found on the theater website: http://www.winterstheatre.org/

I would love for you to be part of this leg of my life’s journey. Who knows what the next bend in the river will bring? But you will surely read about it!

THE END.

 

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Filed under Acting, Cambodia, Cambodian activist Mu Sochua, Careers, community theater, Personal experience, Seven, Uncategorized, Winters Community Theater