Category Archives: meditation

Contemplation at the Kitchen Sink  

May 2020

“For fast-acting relief, try slowing down.” Lily Tomlin

When does a chore become a relaxation tool?

I was a little surprised when this happened to me. A couple of weeks ago, our dishwasher died and so I started doing dishes by hand.

For the first few days, I rushed through this task wanting to finish as soon as possible.

But slowly, a funny thing happened at the kitchen sink. I found myself slowing down and taking my time. The more I paid attention to the endeavor at hand, the more I found myself relaxing.

A close and wise relative of mine was always reminding me to slow down and take my time and so I thought I knew how to do this.

But now I discovered something new: Slowing down made an unpleasant chore, enjoyable and satisfying.

I found harmony in the kitchen sink and soon a pile of dirty dishes was no longer daunting.

Just don’t tell my husband because eventually I’d like a new dishwasher!

OTHER EXCITING NEWS:

May has always been a special month in our family. Twenty-eight years ago in May I became a mother and celebrated my first Mother’s Day. That first one was extra special because my mother was with me. She took care of my newborn so I could go out and get a pedicure, neck and shoulder massage and a haircut. It was one of the most unforgettable days of my life as a new mother.

On May 5, there will be another baby in our house. Before you jump to conclusions, this one is a book. Yes, my next book will come out into the world soon. I’m excited and happy to share this latest novel with all of you.  The book launch video will be posted on my website and I hope you all watch it and support me by buying a book or two. This book will be the perfect Mother’s Day or any day gift for a loved one.

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Christmas Memories

December 2019

Our memory of childhood traditions is what makes holidays so special. A unique ornament or the heady aroma of baking spices or the sound of laughter can evoke joy and poignant reminders of our past.

Growing up in India we celebrated a variety of holidays: Kerala New Year (Vishu), Harvest Festival (Onam) and Festival of Lights (Deepavali), but Christmas was not one of them.  However, thanks to our neighbors my family experienced the warmth of this special day.

It was the late 1970s and we were living in the hilltop town of Coonoor in the beautiful Nilgiris or Blue Mountains of south India. Our neighbors were Christian and invited us to attend a Christmas Eve mass at the local church. At first we were a little reluctant to celebrate a holiday in a church, a place we normally just passed on our way to school. As Hindus would this be an appropriate thing to do?

After a bit of thought, my mother had the answer. She held up her right hand and spread out her fingers.

“Pretend each finger represents a religion,” she said “The thumb is Hinduism; the pointing finger is Christianity and so on.  Each finger is part of the whole, the hand. Just like the fingers are united by the hand and merge into the wrist, I believe in the end all religions come together to become part of the supreme source.”

She added, “That’s why fighting about religion never made sense to me.”

So we accepted our neighbors’ invitation to the Christmas Eve celebration. The warm glow of candles, the scent of burning incense and the sound of Christmas carols (sung in the local language) became a part of an unforgettable experience for us. Later, our neighbors shared a plate of holiday cookies. Christmas that day tasted of nutmeg-spiked crackers, fruit cake cookies with candied lemon peel and the unique Kerala rose cookies or achappams. My sister and I savored the different and exotic flavors as the church bells rang.

My taste buds and heart still sing when I think of those long ago memories. Some things you never forget.

Wishing you all a holiday season filled with unforgettable memories! See you all in 2020 with exciting publishing news.

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Garden meditation

August 2019

“Everything that slows us down and forces patience; everything that sets us back into the slow circles of nature is a help. Gardening is an instrument of grace.” ~May Sarton.

Our tiny backyard garden is a year-round source of peace and produce.

Gardening is a form of meditation for my husband. He finds solace and joy in pulling weeds, preparing the soil, carefully planting the seeds, watering and nurturing the plants and then harvesting the fruits of his labor.

Harvesting cherry tomatoes or handfuls of fragrant herbs gives him immense pleasure. The fact his harvest ends up on his dinner plate makes the whole process even more satisfying.

I love fresh produce but I admit gardening is not my thing.  That doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy our backyard oasis. In the middle of the day, when the lawnmowers and leaf blowers are finally turned off, a warm stillness settles in the garden. The neighborhood children are in school and there is a profound silence all around me.

The warm sun, chirping birds, buzzing bees and an occasional butterfly are my only companions. Some days the peace is broken when a territorial fight breaks out between the mocking birds and the aggressive Scrub Jays. These tiny guardians are fiercely protective of their space.

The bees and butterflies pay no attention to the screeching birds. Gathering nectar from golden sunflowers and purple zinnias is much more important.

As the day warms and the sun’s heat wilts the green basil and the valiant tomato vines, I settle in the shade to enjoy the peace. For me the real harvest is not the produce but the serenity of growing things.

Surrounded by verdant and lush bushes and plants, my breathing slows down. I can feel my muscles loosen and my aches and pains fading.

Northern California’s fierce heat melts away my cares and worries. As my body relaxes my mind calms down. Those annoying thoughts zapping around my brain slowly wind down.

I don’t usually call this meditation but sitting in my little green garden on a quiet weekday afternoon does feel like a moment of deep reflection. Now I understand what my husband finds so tranquil in the garden.

Recently we visited our son in his first apartment. His tiny patio is a little green oasis. I hope he discovers the restfulness of being surrounded by growing things, even if it is just one cherry tomato vine, a single pepper plant and a few herbs.

Making a place for quiet contemplation, a moment of mindfulness and meditation is essential in this busy world. I hope all of you find a minute or two to slow down and breathe deeply.

 

 

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